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A Closer Look at pH

During the day, our metabolic rate increases (acidity generated by metabolism goes up) and our pH becomes more alkaline, to allow us to maintain pH7.

During the night, our metabolic rate decreases (acidity generated by metabolism goes down) and our pH becomes less alkaline, to allow us to maintain pH7.

At night, because there is less acid from metabolism, the body requires less alkalinity.

We need to take a closer look at pH. pH7 merely indicates there’s an equal amount of acid and alkali in the body; it does not indicate how much acid and alkali are present. The amount of acid and alkali in the body has implications for the amount of hydrogen (H+) and hydroxide (OH-) ions in the body, respectively.

Our central nervous system—via the eye, the pineal gland, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN)—is constantly scanning and attuning to the speed of light. When we read light, we read time. All of our cells do this, and they do it individually.

When we are faster than time (the speed of light), there is too much acid in the body. As a result, the body’s demand for alkalinity spikes (allowing us to maintain pH7). This results in a paradox. When we are too fast, we are simultaneously too alkaline.

When we are slower than time (the speed of light), there is too little acid in the body. As a result, the body’s demand for alkalinity plummets (allowing us to maintain pH7). This, too, results in a paradox. When we are too slow, we are simultaneously too acidic.

This pH paradox causes metabolic gridlock. If the body is already too alkaline, how can it allow the basal metabolic rate to slow down, and generate less acid? (Autism) If the body is already too acidic, how can it allow the basal metabolic rate to increase, and generate more acid? (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome)

In ME/CFS (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome), I believe the basal metabolic rate is too slow. Because there is not enough acid being generated by metabolism, the body’s demands for alkalinity are also too low. In other words, in ME/CFS, there is insufficient acidity (H+), but the body will not allow the acidity to be increased—though it desperately needs it—because the alkalinity (OH-) is being kept artificially low (via aldosterone and antidiuretic hormone). The brain is keeping the alkalinity too low, to balance the low acidity.

In Autism, I believe the basal metabolic rate is too fast. Because there is too much acid being generated by metabolism, the body’s demands for alkalinity are also too high. In Autism, there is too much acidity (H+), but the body will not allow the acidity to be decreased—though it desperately needs it—because the alkalinity (OH-) is being kept artificially high. The brain is keeping the alkalinity too high, to balance the high acidity.

In Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, when the acidity and alkalinity are both too low, the body’s hydrogen (H+) and hydroxide (OH-) ion reserves will also be too low. It will have too little hydrogen and too little oxygen, in a ratio of 2:1. To counteract this, the body can retain extra water, by producing excess anti-diuretic hormone. There’s only one problem. The body does not need to merely retain extra water. It needs to split it.

This could also affect the systemic oxygen extraction (SOE).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31493035

We age because we have been accelerating for too long. We are too accelerated. Because the basal metabolic rate is too high, the amount of acid being generated by metabolism is too high. As a result, the body’s compensatory alkalinity (pH) must be held too high. Our engines are flooding.

We need to slow the basal metabolic rate, which will extend the lifespan. But the brain will not allow our acidity to decrease while we are being flooded with alkalinity. We are in metabolic acidosis and alkalosis at the same time.