The Perception of Time

The brain is a magnificent thing. But one of its limitations is that it needs a backdrop against which to perceive. It observes a world of which it is also a part. But how can we observe something and be something at the same time? How can an eye see an eye?

We do not perceive the passage of time when we are one with it. For instance, we may look at a flower, and be aware that it is blooming, but we do not really see the blooming unless we look at it with time-lapse photography.

We only perceive time when its pace is different from our own.

Indeed, time, in a manner of speaking, only exists as something we may observe and measure when its speed is different from our own. For this reason, we might say that time is emergent, meaning it is not fundamental to the universe, but is, rather, a function of our perception. When we look backward, time looks hot (the sun). When we look forward, time looks cold (the moon). Our own experience of time—the light of day—we are effectively blind to. To see time upon ourselves—as to see the rose blooming—requires a separate observer.

We do not perceive the speed of time unless we are in front of or behind it. If we are in front of it, time looks fast; but it is we who are fast. If we are behind it, time looks slow; but it is we who are slow. This is the paradox.

Only if we as the observer are ahead of ourselves in time will we witness our aging as accelerated—akin to seeing the flower bloom via time-lapse photography. Only if we as the observer are behind ourselves in time will we witness our aging as decelerated—akin to putting berries in the freezer. There is a relationship between time and the consciousness that perceives it. Time does not exist without a consciousness to perceive it, and the rate at which it passes is a reflection of the consciousness that is perceiving it.

In other words, when we see the flower bloom and decay quickly, it is not that the flower is dying at an accelerated rate. It is that our brain is spinning at an accelerated rate. It is our sight that is accelerated.

We have been taught that the universe is exploding (expanding). But the universe is material, and this hypothesis—like the work of George Berkeley, René Descartes, John Locke, and many others—is a refutation of materialism.

Rather than believing that the universe is exploding, let’s consider a new angle. Time itself is exploding. If you explode too quickly, you have Parkinson’s. If you explode too slowly, you have Lou Gehrig’s disease.

At time (at the speed of light), the forces of magnetism and electricity are in balance. If the brain perceives itself as being behind time, the magnetic force will be too high, and the body will have to supply a surfeit of electricity, to compensate. This is Parkinson’s.

If the brain perceives itself as too far forward in time, the electric force will be too high, and the body will have to supply a surfeit of the magnetic force, to compensate. This is Lou Gehrig’s disease. Iron facilitates the magnetic force; manganese facilitates the electric force.

If we are behind time (e.g. Parkinson’s), time will be too fast. When time is too fast, it is akin a kind of dopamine toxicity, as we over-supply dopamine in an attempt to slow time down.

If we are ahead of time (e.g. Lou Gehrig’s disease), time will be too slow. When time is too slow, it is akin to a kind of serotonin toxicity, as we over-supply serotonin in an attempt to speed time up.

Again, iron facilitates the magnetic force; manganese facilitates the electric force. Anything that confuses the body’s perception of manganese confuses the body’s understanding of time. I do not eat or drink anything that has been exposed to RoundUp (glyphosate), and I have not for four years. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/aug/11/one-mans-suffering-exposed-monsantos-secrets-to-the-world

If all our illnesses can be understood as dysfunction in the way the brain is understanding time, all our illnesses can be fixed.

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