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The pH Paradox

Our central nervous system—via the eye, the pineal gland, and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN)—is constantly scanning the environment and attuning to the speed of light. When we read light, we read time. As we read time, we set our metabolic rate accordingly. But here’s the catch, and the reason we get caught in a trap: our metabolic rate itself will alter the speed of light we read. Any derangement becomes self-reinforcing.

When our core metabolic rate is faster than time (the speed of light), there will be too much acid in the body. As a result, the body’s demand for alkalinity will spike (allowing us to maintain pH7). This results in a pH paradox. When we are too fast, we are simultaneously too alkaline.

When the core metabolic rate is faster than time, aging is accelerated, and our natural lifespan is truncated.

When our core metabolic rate is slower than time (the speed of light), there is too little acid in the body. As a result, the body’s demand for alkalinity plummets (allowing us to maintain pH7). This too results in a pH paradox. When we are too slow, we are simultaneously too acidic.

Let’s say all illness is metabolic. For instance, I believe the core etiology of autism is an accelerated basal metabolic rate. Time is too fast, so light is forced to be too slow. But if our basal metabolism is too fast—too acidic—the brain won’t allow it to become more alkaline unless the pH becomes more acidic. Meanwhile, the gut won’t allow the pH to become more acidic unless the basal metabolism becomes more alkaline. We get caught in a loop. Human beings have a hardware vs. software problem. But we can fix it.

We need to take a closer look at pH. pH7 merely indicates there’s an equal amount of acid and alkali in the body; it does not indicate how much acid and alkali are present. The amount of acid and alkali in the body has implications for the amount of hydrogen (H+) and hydroxide (OH-) ions, respectively.

Behind the scenes, pH7 is not neutral. It’s a plus and a minus (positive and negative ions) that are effectively canceling each other out. pH7 just means there’s an equal amount of positive and negative ions in the body; not the right amount. In Autism, the amount of ions (energy) is too high. In Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, it’s too low.

When time is too fast, light is forced to be too slow (Autism). And when time is too slow, light is forced to be too fast (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome). The pH is capable of compensating for and “correcting” the basal metabolic rate, to keep us alive at pH7. But in so doing, it masks the metabolic derangement.

What Happened to Me

When I was sick, I was so much more than tired. If I climbed a flight of stairs, I wanted to slump to the ground and weep. The mere act of being conscious seemed too much for me. I could sleep for eighteen hours, easy. In my life, if I’ve ever been really good at one thing, it’s sleeping.

But my sleep grew dysregulated. Its effects were mitigated, instead of compounding. At night, instead of gathering density, I kept trying to increase my speed (drenching night sweats). During the day, instead of increasing my speed, I kept trying to gather density (crushing fatigue).

My perception of time was askew. I was tracking with a different sun and a different moon. I had, among other things, paradoxical thiamine deficiency. I needed thiamine, but if I took thiamine, it increased my need for thiamine.

Why?

Thiamine powers the Krebs (energy) cycle. But what is energy? Depending on where we are in time, energy can mean different things. When energy is used to make energy, it supplies energy. But when energy is used to make density, it costs energy.

Because my perception of time was off, I was using my energy cycle to make matter. I was endogenously producing oxalate. Oxalate, a crystal found in plants capable of photosynthesis, is light that is denser than light. The more oxalate I produced, the more energy I needed. Taking thiamine increased my need for thiamine; increasing my speed increased my need for speed.

Image of Oxalate Crystal: Facebook ‘Trying Low Oxalates’

I’d become an energy sieve, using my Krebs cycle to make a form of energy that actually costs energy—kind of like paying off your debts with debts that charge even higher interest.

E=mc^2. There’s an economics to physics. For matter to behave as energy requires speed. And what’s speed? More energy. For energy to behave as matter requires density. And what’s density? More matter. It’s inefficient. But for matter to be matter and energy to be energy is easy.

According to this paradigm, the visible universe is operating at the speed of light. The first c, the universe itself, is like a bead on an abacus that slides from M (matter) to E (energy). The second c is reflected in the M/E. When the M/E is high, light is fast. When the M/E is low, light is slow. When the universe reaches the tipping point on the M/E continuum that’s equal to the speed of light, what then? Instead of energy being diminished as we use it, as we use it, energy will be renewed.

How does the formula for mass-energy equivalence (E=mc^2) not violate the law of conservation of mass? Here’s one way: matter doesn’t become energy, it masquerades as energy. But as the universe accelerates, we reach a tipping point after which the masks come off.

Time runs forward (accelerates) until it reaches the speed of light. Then it runs backward (decelerates).

Fresh Eyes

I believe that in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, the basal metabolic rate is too slow. And in Autism, it’s too fast. Why don’t we perceive the perturbed metabolic rate? Because the pH is inversely deranged—a corrective that masks it. In Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, I’m too alkaline—but we don’t see it because I’m also too acidic. In Autism, I’m too acidic—but we don’t see it because I’m also too alkaline.

What, actually, is the basal metabolic rate? It’s our processing speed. It’s time. If time is too slow, light will be too fast (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome). If time is too fast, light will be too slow (Autism).

Time and light toggle. If my basal metabolic rate is too alkaline, my pH will be too acidic. But when my pH is too acidic, melatonin is not stable; it degrades too quickly. In Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, what looks melatonin surfeit may actually be melatonin insufficiency, where the problem isn’t that I don’t have melatonin, but that it’s not stable at my pH—so I have to keep producing it.

If my core metabolic rate is too acidic, my pH will be too alkaline. But when my pH is too alkaline, dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is not stable; it degrades too quickly. In Autism Spectrum Disorder, what looks like DMT surfeit may actually be DMT insufficiency, where the problem isn’t that I don’t have DMT, but that it’s not stable at my pH—so I have to keep producing it.

I Sing the Body Electric

If time moves like a swing, where on the pull we gather density so that on the release we can gather speed, when I was sick, I was stuck. My swing was upright. I was both too dense and not dense enough.

I’m in perimenopause now, and it’s the same thing with estrogen. I’m stuck; I have both too much and not enough. Estrogen, like other hormones, tracks with light and time. It waxes and wanes; its healthy functioning depends on a range. Because my swing is upright, my estrogen neither spikes nor plummets, but hovers mid-range, where its functionality is lost.

What matters isn’t that I possess estrogen; it’s that my estrogen move. For females to menstruate, our estrogen has to dip. But for estrogen to be able to dip, first it has to spike—and there’s no room. In other words, it has to go up, so that it can go down, so that it can go up, etc. It has to pulse. Static estrogen is dead to us; it carries no information. Our hormones and neurotransmitters have to move—movement is energy. Movement, we can read.

Without estrogen, in turn, I lose the use of choline (cellular membrane stability); I absorb less vitamin K; I lose vitamin K-dependent matrix GLA protein. I lose the ability to modulate my density. I need estrogen to make estrogen. Time is a loop, and I am locked out.

My body tries to catch up, but I’ve lost my range of motion: my swing. When I attempt to accelerate but am not dense enough—or attempt to gather density but am not fast enough—I get slack in the line, and lose energy (heat).

We’re Caught in a Trap

Why do we age? We get caught in a metabolic trap. We’re not dense enough to move forward in time, and not fast enough to move back. Time, slowly, stands still. After we’ve been accelerating for about 50 years, we hit a cul-de-sac. We are maximally accelerated; we need to shift to a lower gear. But though brain wants to decrease the metabolic rate, the pH won’t allow it. And though the gut wants to decrease the pH, the metabolic rate won’t allow it. Instead of hugging pH7, we start swinging from 14à0 and 0à14.

We need to part the veil on pH and measure it not as a flat digit—purple—but see it as two digits—red and blue. I can be a 7 that is truly itself, and be in a great state of health. Or I can be a 7 that’s the resolve of a 0 and a 14, and have lost nearly all my homeostatic capacity—meaning I can no longer regulate my blood sugar, my blood pressure, etc. And worse: I can’t keep pace with time. The universe is accelerating and expanding, and I am left behind.

Font of the Neuroendocrine Cascade

The body—the cell—is ingenious. It opposes time not by confronting it, but by leaning in. It uses time. When it senses density, it uses acidity to make energy. When it senses energy, it uses alkalinity to make matter. When I was sick, I was angry at my body. I realize now I should have been praising it instead.

Sodium and potassium are the levers we use. To move forward in time, we pull sodium outside the cell and push potassium in. To move backward in time, we pull potassium outside the cell and push sodium in. In the former, we make energy. In the latter, we make matter.

Timing—circadian rhythm—is key. We can’t accelerate unless we’re sufficiently dense, and we can’t gather density unless we’re sufficiently fast. At night, we gather density, so that during the day, we can gather speed.

But how do we know when we’re dense enough to move forward in time, or fast enough to move back?

The pineal gland.

When the pineal gland perceives acidity, it produces melatonin, and we go to sleep. Melatonin acts upon the parathyroid glands, which influence calcium release, and help us to modulate our density.

Conversely, when the pineal gland perceives alkalinity, it produces DMT (dimethyltryptamine), and we wake up.

Melatonin is the chemical signal for darkness and density; DMT is the chemical signal for daylight and speed.

But there’s a catch.

If our basal metabolic rate is too slow, the pineal gland will misperceive itself as acidic and overproduce melatonin. If our basal metabolic rate is too fast, the pineal gland will misperceive itself as alkaline and overproduce DMT.

Perception isn’t absolute. It’s relative. When we perceive acidity, we slow down. When we perceive alkalinity, we speed up. But the perception of acidity or alkalinity depends upon our own acidity or alkalinity.

I recently had general anesthesia, during which my experience of time was altered. When I came home, plain ice cream tasted like the saltiest thing I had ever had in my mouth. I couldn’t bear it. I had to spit it out.

We must learn to better account for perception’s effects in our analysis of human health. For a deeper understanding of how perception helps us to construct reality, I recommend the jaw-dropping work of Donald Hoffman and Klee Irwin. Irwin’s video is slightly long, but you only need the first 7 mins to get the gist of what it’d mean if consciousness were structured like a language (i.e. if we are the word being made flesh).

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Shattering Cancer with Resonant Frequencies

TEDx Talks
Published on 22 Dec 2013

Anthony Holland: Associate Professor, Director of Music Technology, Skidmore College. DMA, MM, MM, BM; President: Novobiotronics Inc. [a nonprofit 501(c)(3) charitable and educational company]. Discovered the ability of Oscillating Pulsed Electric Fields (OPEF) to destroy cancer cells and MRSA in laboratory experiments. Expert in custom digital electronic signal design, synthesis and analysis for biological effects. Member: Bioelectromagnetics Society (BEMS), European Bioelectromagnetics Association (EBEA). Postdoctoral work: Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA) Stanford University. Advanced Digital Synthesis and Analysis studies with: Max Mathews (the ‘ Father of Computer Music’), John Chowning (founding Director of CCRMA, Electronic Composer and Inventor (famed FM Synthesis Patent); Jean-Claude Risset (Electronic Composer and founding Director of the Digital Synthesis Division of the internationally renowned IRCAM center, Paris, France); John Pierce: former Director of Sound Division: Bell Laboratories. 

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

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The Core Etiology of Cancer:

Could it be this?

Fischer Black, Fille

My father died of oral cancer at age 57 in 1995, exactly one hundred years after the death of Louis Pasteur. By the time they found the squamous cell carcinoma at the base of his tongue, it was already stage four. When he delivered the news, he asked if I knew why it was that people had to die. I shook my head; I was so heartbroken that speech was not available to me. “To make room for the babies,” he said.

In addition to surgery and radiation, his oncologist prescribed multivitamins, which I used to pick up for him. I noticed something about the bottles. At the bottom, in full caps, they said: COPPER- and IRON-FREE.

Twenty years later, when my own health faltered, I also had problems with copper and iron. I needed them, but—like thiamine—taking them seemed to make me worse.

Like a cancerous cell, I was trapped. Inert. My perception of time (the M/E) was askew; I was too much M and not enough E. Because my energy (rate of spin) was too low, my copper was not able to function as electricity and my iron was not able to function as magnetism. A paradox kept me stuck: I need to be cycling time at the right speed (core metabolic rate) for copper to function as electricity and iron to function as magnetism. But I need sufficient energy—electromagnetism—in order to cycle time at the right speed.

As I fell farther behind time, though my body desperately needed and hoarded them, my copper and iron only accumulated in my tissues in their inert forms (as M, not E), where they were worse than useless: they increased my need for speed.

The body must hold together (vitamin K1) as it accelerates—and as it decelerates, it must hold apart (vitamin K2). If magnetism (iron) and electricity (copper) are not available, I will substitute as best I can. I will use calcium—cement.

Calcium works in the short-term, but it damages me in the long-term. Magnetism anchors me in time; calcium traps me in it. When I use calcium instead of magnetism to hold myself together, I steal from internal strength to make external strength: my hard tissues soften and my soft tissues harden. My bones grow porous, my teeth get cavities, my arteries become brittle, my skin crepes, my heart strains, my sodium-calcium exchanger loses its potential, and my nerve cells perish. Over time, I essentially ossify, and die. You might say my heart—in addition to everything else—hardens.

When I’m forced to use calcium to hold myself together, it inverts the functioning of vitamins D and K. And worse: in the face of high free calcium, to maintain the action potential of my sodium-calcium exchanger, I must retain sodium—for as long as I can. But sodium will increase my core metabolic rate, and the more sodium I retain, the more calcium I need! My consciousness is not able to move forward in time, and my brain slowly dies (Alzheimer’s).

Once I calcify, I damage my perception of time. I think I’m in a dense time signature, but it’s my own density I’m reading.

Working Time in Reverse

When time slows down, light speeds up (the sun). And when time speeds up, light slows down (the moon). The speeds of light and time should alternate in synchronicity with the universe.

But if our metronome is off, instead of toggling back and forth at the proper rate, time and light will toggle either too quickly or too slowly. This represents a change in time signature.

When we don’t keep pace with the speed of light—if we’re either too slow or too fast—our mass-energy equivalence gets skewed toward matter. We are too much matter and not enough energy, meaning time is too slow and light is too fast. We are, effectively, too dense.

Under these conditions, instead of electricity and magnetism in the body, we get their material “precipitates”: copper and iron.

If time keeps slowing down, light will keep speeding up. But what happens when we have light’s speed going up and up inside the same amount of mass? It strains the M/E (matter to energy) ratio. We have too much energy in too small a space. So what does it do? It splits.

If our density—our M/E—is too low or too high for this plane of time, it forces the cell to double (or triple, or quadruple, etc.) or divide. The M/E is how our cells read time. If they read the wrong density, they will cycle time at the wrong speed.

Do all of our cells read density collectively so that the body may advance in unison? No. Each cell reads time individually. Why? To allow for cell cleavage and blastulation—embryogenesis.

The ability to cycle time at different speeds within a single organism is perhaps our greatest gift. It’s creation. It’s gestation. It’s how we continue life on this plane. This mechanism is at work wherever you see the term genesis. So it’s in gluconeogenesis, and embryogenesis …

… but it’s also in pathogenesis. And oncogenesis. That’s the flip side of the coin. When cells possess altered density—a skewed M/E—it alters their speed.

Cancerous cells are working time in reverse. Instead of speeding up and slowing down (increasing the metabolic rate and increasing the pH), they’re slowing down and speeding up (decreasing the metabolic rate and decreasing the pH). Because their metabolism is skewed toward “night,” their melatonin needs are outsized. If a cell perceives excess relative density (e.g. oxalate crystal where there would be light; or iron where there would be magnetism), instead of using dark energy to make energy, it will use dark matter to make matter.

Oxalate is a crystal found in plants capable of photosynthesis

Instead of growing out toward the future, along with the expanding universe, these cells will grow in toward the past.

To us, cells with processing errors will appear to be cycling time too quickly—i.e. over-replicating, in the case of cancer; or over-multiplying, in the case of microbes. But this is a misperception. In truth, because of their higher density, they’re cycling time more slowly than we are—causing their light to cycle too fast.

Often, we see not the derangement, but the derangement’s opposite (antidote). When we’re hyperactive, we don’t need to slow down; we need to speed up.

The DNA is our code, and it’s protean. It’s designed to adapt to the changing dynamics of time. As it perceives its environment, it changes accordingly (epigenetics). This is why the environment—both inside and outside our bodies—is so important to our development, and why adding chemicals to our environment can damage us.

If the universe is all one thing, like a balloon inflating and collapsing, our notions of “pathogens” and “enemies” may need to be re-examined. Germs cause disease, yes. But what causes germs? According to this hypothesis, the root cause is always alterations in the speeds of light and time.

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Time Is Triune: Forward, Backward, or Singularity

I just watched one of the smartest science videos I’ve ever seen (and I’ve seen a lot of science videos!). I’ll paste it, with my comment beneath.

BRILLIANT. Thank you, Science Asylum. And there’s more: why do objects, from planets to particles, SPIN? Take a look at the 5-minute mark. You’ve accurately depicted that the time gradient makes the squirrel’s head “top-heavy” and therefore it spins to the right (sinks). But wouldn’t same gradient make the squirrel’s feet “bottom-light” and spin to the left, or rise? We think of time as only moving from left to right. But what if, as certain languages (e.g. Hebrew), and indigenous traditions (e.g. the Aymara) suggest, time ALSO moves from right to left? (Lightbulb emoji here!) That’d mean some of your particles, at the bottom-most layer, would not just appear to be SLOWER, but would actually appear to be moving IN THE OTHER DIRECTION. (* The Aymara speakers of the Andes consider the past to be in front of them, the future behind them.) There’s not just time DILATION, there’s time CONTRACTION—or what Lorentz inaccurately called “length contraction.” And hey, might these differences in the speeds of time play a role in human disease? I sure think so. Want to cure cancer? Let’s look at special relativity. https://medium.com/@alethea/special-relativity-the-key-to-disease-c7e862db0dc7

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As Time Speeds Up, Light Slows Down

Bryan Enderle, a wonderful science professor at UC Davis, was kind enough to give me some feedback on my work which prompted me to come up with a Nutshell Version. In fact, this is something I should have done to begin with. Who wants 10,000 or 20,000 words? Let me give you this whole hypothesis in a few paragraphs.

I believe the speed of light is actually zero. The world we observe with our senses is emergent, and it is light from which it is emerging. The degree of emergence is reflected in the speed of light. The farther backward in time we are, the faster light’s speed.

But why, then, does light’s speed not perceptibly change? Because time’s speed is changing proportionately. At the Big Bang, light’s speed is c, and time’s speed is zero. At the End of Time, light’s speed is zero, and time’s speed is c. Light and time are trading places.

As time speeds up, light slows down. Or, as time slows down, light speeds up. Though there is an “End of Time,” it is merely the point of reversal. Time never ends.

We do not perceive light’s speed changing, because our sight is unable to distinguish between a train traveling at speed c, and a train traveling at speed zero on a track that is traveling at speed c. We speak of the universe as accelerating, yet we do not take its movement into account, in our equations. This is not an inertial frame.

This PBS Space Time video explains what I mean by “inertial frame.” Einstein asked “What if gravity is fake?” I echo him, and ask: “What if gravity is fake, and the speed of light is inversely proportionate to the speed of time?”

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MatterEnergy, TimeLight

The universe is all one thing, and that one thing is neither matter nor energy. Matter and energy are not things; they are states. Furthermore—and, most importantly, when it comes to human illness—the same state can be achieved in different ways.

I believe the universe is comprised of light, and is emerging from light. Light is the a priori fabric of the cosmos, and we are the light of the world. But we are light incarnate—light that is appearing in material form. And it is the appearing in material form that is tricky. The same material form can be achieved in different ways.

Think of light as like water. To appear as water, water can be ice that is spinning very fast. Or water can simply be water. To appear as light, matter can either spin very fast (at light’s speed). Or it can simply be itself. Because itself is not really matter; it’s MatterEnergy.

It’s as if light exists between two poles—sun and moon. At one, it is very dense and spinning very fast. At the other, it’s very fast and spinning very slow. One is hot; the other cold. In our circadian rhythm, we swing between them. When we spin very fast (diurnal rhythm, “sun”), we must hold together. We need density: vitamin D, vitamin K. When we spin very slowly (nocturnal rhythm, “moon”), we must hold apart. We need inverse density: vitamin K2. In either case, we need the most abundant mineral in the body, which vitamins D, K, and K2 manipulate: calcium.

Exactly what is the universe that is emerging from light? Time. Time emerges from light, and the emergence goes both ways. When time has speed, light is the medium. When light has speed, time is the medium. Light and time are twin sides of the same thing, and are emerging from each other.

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Not Dust but Breath

We look out of our eyes and we see a flute, or a stained-glass window, and so we think we are the flute, or the stained-glass window. But we are not the instrument, but rather the breath that moves through it. Not the window, but the light that shines through it. We are not the body, but the consciousness that observes it.

If the material world is emergent, perhaps it is emerging from that which it already is; it is becoming itself. Indeed, how could it become anything other than itself? Only light can travel at the speed of light. Only consciousness can be conscious.

We think we’re the receiver—the radio, the laptop—when, in fact, we are the signal that is being received. We are the voice, not the mouth. And the voice is universal, though it varies from mouth to mouth. This is what is meant by the phrase “many parts, all one body.”

It is breath that is alive. Not dust.

“Then the LORD God formed a man from the dust of the ground

and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life,

and the man became a living being.”

Genesis 2:7

I’m always trying to think of new ways of envisioning things, and I worry I’m not very good at it(!). In this case, I’ve been imagining an invisible hand. Consciousness is like an invisible hand that can only know itself—probe itself, experience itself, feel itself—through a material glove. We’re all gloves, and the gloves are unique. But the hand that fills them is the same hand.

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Airplane

When we’re on an airplane, it almost seems as if we’re not really moving, and in truth, we’re not. If space is emergent (Google ’emergence theory’ or watch some of the videos on this site if the concept of emergence is unfamiliar to you), then distance is emergent, too. We must re-imagine what it means to move. The observer and the observed are twin sides of the same event; like an actor walking on a stage that turns in the opposite direction of his stride. We do not really move. We spin.

This video described as ‘Airplane Freezes in Mid-Air’ is a good primer to help us to re-imagine movement in a new way.

Consider this: the airplane—as well as everything in the universe—is always moving at the same speed. When it’s at 30,000 feet, it’s simply in a larger circle of time. You might say its relationship to time has changed; its definition of ‘Now’ has increased in size. The rate at which it travels and the distance over which it travels have both increased simultaneously; there is no change in its speed. Everything in the visible universe is happening at the speed of light.

So too with us. The universe is accelerating and expanding. When we are ‘higher’ than time (viz. altitude sickness) we spin faster than light, so we must increase our density in order to hold together. And when we are ‘lower’ than time we spin slower than light (viz. deep-sea divers), so we must *also* increase our density. Therein lies the rub. The crucial distinction here is which type of density we increase: whether we move calcium to the bones, or to the blood. The spaceflight osteopenia (calcium dysregulation) experienced by astronauts might be likened to an accelerated version of the same calcium dysregulation all of us experience as we age.

If we are faster than time (if our spin rate is accelerated), we will generate too much acid in the body, and will need calcium, as a buffer. We need extracellular calcium, which we will pull from the bones. Another way to say ‘faster than time’ is to say we are less dense than time. An astronaut (vis-à-vis an observer on earth) is both faster and less dense than we are.

If we are slower than time (if our spin rate is decelerated), we will generate less acid and need less extracellular calcium. But our increased density will increase our need for calcium—intracellular calcium, which we pull from the blood. Another way to say ‘slower than time’ is to say we are denser than time.

Time, in a sense, is constant. It is we who dip lower or fly higher than it as we gather momentum to fuel our spin. In the diurnal portion of the circadian rhythm, we dip lower than time. The sun is light that is slower than time (so to us, it will appear faster and hotter; our brains will ‘correct for’ the speed of light). The moon is light that is faster than time (so to us, it will appear slower and denser). According to this paradigm, time is the speed of light. The sun is light that is slower than light—so to us it appears faster, as energy. The moon is light that is faster than light—so to us it appears slower, as matter.

We may also see our brains “correcting” for the speed of light experimentally. In the fourth state of matter experiment, we are slowing time down, so we see light speed up (the hydrogen atoms lose their locality and smear out in a ring). In the double-slit experiment, we see the opposite. When we accelerate the photons, we are speeding time up, so we see light slow down (the wave function collapses back to a particle). Our brains will not allow us to deviate from the speed of light. The speed of light is our processing speed. We are the light of the world.

Here’s one final way to think of it. The speed of light, c, is a constant. So the speed of light, c^2, is a constant. So just take it out of the equation. M = E. There’s a relationship, an equilibrium (hence the equal sign) between matter and energy. When our energy increases, our matter must increase apace. When we increase our speed, we must increase our density. When I eat foods that are high in oxalate (energy), I need more calcium (density).

Oxalate is a crystal found in plants capable of photosynthesis. If matter is EMERGENT, and it is emerging FROM LIGHT, oxalate is light that is denser than light. It is read by the brain as high-energy.

To increase our speed, we pull calcium into the blood (this is why calcium sufficiency is so important for labor contractions, and why calcium can treat pre-eclampsia). To increase our density, we push calcium into the bones. As we manipulate calcium from extracellular calcium to intracellular calcium, increasing our speed and our density by turns, we move around in time.

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Blood and Calcium

This week, I had an adverse reaction to vitamin K2 MK-7, menaquinone. It made my blood too thin. Because my blood was too thin, my metabolic rate had to increase, to substitute for the loss in hydraulic pressure, so to speak. My metabolic rate (spin rate) was as high as it could go, yet still insufficient; I had a feeling that I was not getting enough oxygen (hypoxia), and I experienced orthostatic intolerance, ringing in my ears, and vertigo—loss of calcium homeostasis.

I believe there’s a hidden variable we have not yet been considering in our analysis of human health—SPIN. Spin may be defined as an equilibrium between density and speed. When my spin (core metabolic rate) increases, my density must increase apace, in order for the body to hold together. It’s a crude metaphor, but: if we increase the mixing speed of a bowl of batter—and we want the batter to maintain the same density—we must also add more flour.

By taking calcium out of my blood, my body experienced a drop in orthostatic pressure that it sought to remedy by adding calcium back to my blood—a vicious loop. I experienced a kind of metabolic trap. This metabolic trap is similar, I believe, to that of Raynaud’s Phenomenon. With Raynaud’s, which I experienced often in my 20s, cold weather would cause my body—in particular, my blood—to try to increase its speed and density simultaneously—a contradiction. I wonder if trying to increase speed and density simultaneously might play a role in COVID-19.

What determines whether the body takes calcium from the blood and sends it to the bones, or takes it from the bones and sends it to the blood? I believe a lot has to do with the perception of pH, and that the perception of pH is not absolute, but relative.

Quinine is an alkaloid that has been used to treat malaria and is also the ingredient in tonic water that gives it its bitter taste. Chloroquine is a synthetic version of quinine that is closely related to hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil), which has been looked at as a possible treatment for COVID-19. Here is a description (Wikipedia) of quinine toxicity, which I would like to propose is a state of metabolic acidosis induced by the perception of excess alkalinity:

“Common side effects include headache, ringing in the ears, trouble seeing, and sweating.[3] More severe side effects include deafness, low blood platelets, and an irregular heartbeat.[3] Use can make one more prone to sunburn.[3] While it is unclear if use during pregnancy causes harm to the baby, treating malaria during pregnancy with quinine when appropriate is still recommended.[3] Quinine is an alkaloid, a naturally occurring chemical compound.[3] How it works as a medicine is not entirely clear.[3]”

Could there be a metabolic component to infectious disease? When we perceive alkalinity—such as quinine—we speed up (increase the rate of spin or the core metabolic rate). But the increase in acid generated by metabolism and the increased alkalinity of the terrain are masking each other. We still perceive a pH7, and are blind to the underlying metabolic derangement.

We need to part the veil on pH and measure it not as a flat digit—purple—but see it as two digits—red and blue. I can be a 7 that is truly itself, and be in a great state of health. Or I can be a 7 that’s the resolve of a 0 and a 14, and have lost nearly all my homeostatic capacity—meaning I can no longer regulate my blood sugar, my blood pressure, etc. And worse: I can’t keep pace with time. The universe is accelerating and expanding, and I am left behind.

When our core metabolic rate is faster than normal, there will be too much acid in the body. As a result, the body’s demand for alkalinity will spike (allowing us to maintain pH7). This results in a pH paradox. When we are too fast, we are simultaneously too alkaline.

When our core metabolic rate is slower than normal, there will be too little acid in the body. As a result, the body’s demand for alkalinity will plummet (allowing us to maintain pH7). This too results in a pH paradox. When we are too slow, we are simultaneously too acidic.

If our basal metabolism is too fast—too acidic—the brain won’t allow it to become more alkaline unless the pH first becomes more acidic. Meanwhile, the gut won’t allow the pH to become more acidic unless the basal metabolism first becomes more alkaline. We get caught in a metabolic trap. Human beings have a hardware vs. software problem, so to speak. But we can fix it.

We need to take a closer look at pH. pH7 merely indicates there’s an equal amount of acid and alkali in the body; it does not indicate how much acid and alkali are present. The amount of acid and alkali in the body has implications for the amount of hydrogen (H+) and hydroxide (OH-) ions, respectively.

Behind the scenes, pH7 is not neutral. It’s a plus and a minus (positive and negative ions) that are effectively canceling each other out. pH7 just means there’s an equal amount of positive and negative ions in the body; not the right amount. In Autism, the amount of ions (energy) is too high. In Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, it’s too low.

When time is too fast, light is forced to be too slow (Autism). And when time is too slow, light is forced to be too fast (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome). The pH is capable of compensating for and “correcting” the basal metabolic rate, to keep us alive at pH7. But in so doing, it masks the metabolic derangement.

When time is too fast, there is too little calcium in the blood. When time is too slow, there is too much. When there is too much calcium in the blood, it is not hemodynamically stable and is prone to excess clots. It represents a state of subclinical metabolic acidosis and (perhaps?) compensatory respiratory alkalosis.