Gravity Is Not a Force

Sound shocking? It is. But it’s information we need to absorb if we are to solve the core etiology of our illnesses. This (unless you are reading while in free-fall) is not an inertial frame.

According to Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity, gravity is not a force. There are no gravitational fields. Gravity … “is kind of an illusion.” (Derek Muller) See the educational and entertaining video, below.

Central to these pages is a simple idea: the visible universe is taking place at the speed of light. Gravity is not a force—it’s the drag of the accelerating universe. Gravity is the inverse of the speed of light.

The frame of the observer—the brain’s understanding of the relative speeds of light and time—is central to the pH (light’s speed) and the core metabolic rate (time’s speed) of the body. This principle applies to diseases of the central nervous system (e.g. Parkinson’s, where time is too fast; or ALS, where time is too slow) as well as to individual cells/organs.

If a cell is out of sync with the rest of the body—if its metabolic rate is “faster” but its pH is correspondingly “higher”—it is cancerous. If a microbe is out of sync with the rest of the body—if its metabolic rate is “faster” but its pH is correspondingly “higher”—it is infectious. “Faster” and “higher” are in quotation marks because the perception of speed and pH is relative and depends upon an observer. The cells in your liver tumor are “fast and alkaline” (moon) vis-à-vis the cells in the rest of your body; they may be “dense and acidic” (sun) vis-à-vis the cells in your sister’s liver.

Infection rates of Blastocystis Hominis in some parts of the world are as high as 100% with the “benign” form of the pathogen not because the microbe is qualitatively different there, but because its time signature is in sync with that of the host (observer).

As usual, Veritasium does a terrific job of illustrating why gravity is not a force in this smart and snappy video.

“Matter tells spacetime how to curve. Spacetime tells matter how to move.” —John Wheeler

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